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11/03/2011

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Concerned Reader

The ABA is run by the very law schools who profit from the legal academia scam. Just look at the membership of the committee who decided to stop distinguishing between full and part time jobs, and to stop distinguishing between legal and non-legal jobs. Its members were all tier 2/3/4 law Deans, administrators and professors (there was one Yale professor on the committee, to be fair).

Get off the sidelines? The ABA got off the sidelines long ago, when it was co-opted by the law schools.

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My problem with ABA is that it is eepxnsive so out of the range of many parents. (how good is it if you have to go into debt up to your eyeballs?) Also ABA is not the gold standard they would make it out to be and pure ABA often makes for a child who achieves but is still not quite natural.Floortime and similar therapies can be done at home by all parents and is mostly free (possibly a few bucks to learn a routine but I did it straight from the book as there were no consultants in 1999)I also agree that time and maturity change things as well.Why do some kids get better and others don't? I still think some kids on the spectrum also have a degree of mental retardation or other barriers described by Greenspan in his book The Child with Special Needs.The other issue is that there have always been children like this but in the days of larger families; there was less expectation because you didn't have all your eggs in the one/two basket of our smaller nuclear families of today. If you look back on some family histories; there were kids who were a little slow or "off" and some just improved through being constantly exposed to siblings etc and the parents working with them. Today people have less time and fewer children so it's a "crisis". Just my two cents.

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Today people have less time and fewer children so it's a "crisis". Just my two cents.

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The U.N. says a convoy carrying 21 troops from the Disengagement Observer Force was stopped Wednesday and the troops were detained. The peacekeeping force monitors a cease-fire line between Syrian and Israeli forces near the disputed Golan Heights.The rebels are seeking assurance that Syrian forces will not bombard a nearby town, Jamla, once the peacekeepers are released, the observatory said. The rebels have also demanded thatSyrian troops withdraw from the vicinity of Jamla, where heavy clashes were reported over the weekend.

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About the Blog

  • Rising tuition. Misleading employment statistics. Inadequate skills training. Law schools have faced plenty of criticism for their role in the struggles of young lawyers today. The National Law Journal has assembled a panel of legal educators and law graduates to discuss whether law schools are facing a crisis, and how they should respond to their mounting problems.

Law School Review Contributors

  • Brian Tamanaha
    A professor at Washington University in St. Louis School of Law who writes about law schools on the blog Balkinization
  • Erwin Chemerinsky
    Founding dean of the University of California, Irvine School of Law
  • John F. O’Brien
    Dean of the New England Law, Boston and chairman of the Council of the American Bar Association’s Section on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar
  • Kyle McEntee
    A 2011 graduate of Vanderbilt University Law School and the executive director of Law School Transparency, a nonprofit group advocating for legal education reform
  • Lucille Jewel
    Professor at Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School who has written about the problems faced by recent law school graduates
  • Michael A. Olivas
    A professor at the University of Houston Law Center and the current president of the Association of American Law Schools
  • William Henderson
    Professor at Indiana University Maurer School of Law—Bloomington who studies the legal profession

Law School Review: Further Reading