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« Q&A: Ballard Spahr's Joseph Fanone | Main | The Morning Wrap »

June 24, 2013

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Comments

ELois P. Clayton

Corruption(as such), is constantly being revealed.
ALERT! MORE FOCUS, needs to be put on Chester Mental Health Center, where patients(such as my brother David P. and other patients), have been raped and assaulted in other ways and the administrators, has been COVERING it up OVER (20) years!
ALERT! (X) Hd. admin.(Patricia Kelley-Mosbacher), seems to think that because she'd "retired", she should be exempt from prosecution as an accomplice of these COVERUP of ABUSES/EIGHTH AMENDMENT violations, but as Chicago Police chief, JON BURGE was forced OUT of retirement and JAILED for his role in TORTURING individuals, Patricia Kelley-Mosbacher, should be forced OUT of retirement and prosecuted to the FULLEST extent of the law as well!

Avon

That seems to me like a very humane sentence.

Making brief jail time a condition of probation, rather than a sentence to be served before probation, is likelier to save the man's career from a license suspension or revocation. Making his fine affordable (for a lawyer) rather than crippling will also allow him to move forward. 200 hours is plenty long enough community service to make him think a lot about the reason he's gotta do it, and to remember it forever, but not long enough to become a resentfulness-generating grind or sinkhole.

I think he obstructed justice, and about a nationally-significant issue, too. But I think the purpose of a sentence is hereby fulfilled.

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