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December 19, 2012

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Comments

Rick

" he never deserved such personal vilification as he got".

It wasn't that bad...During Goodwin Liu's nomination process for 9th Circuit, Senator Grassley compared him to Mao Tse-Tung, a bizarre comparison im still trying to comprehend...No one compared Bork to a dictator or Communist leader...Honestly, Kennedy's speech of him (Bork's America) was pretty much spot on what a Bork confirmation would have meant...

To Cody, i was joking about it being a positive for conservatives about Botk's nomination being defeated..I do find it amusing that HAD he been on the court, he might have been replaced with a Pam Karlan, Caitlin Halligan, Diane Wood, Harold Koh, etc...

Avon

Bork is an example of a brilliant and heartfelt lawyer whose ideology often (not always) flirted with the extreme, whose verbal expressions often (far from always) tended to offend, who loved debate, and whose self-confidence and stubbornness could make for a strong Justice yet a controversial candidate for nomination.

In short, he was a highly plausible yet utterly doomed nominee. I'm glad he didn't join the Court, but he never deserved such personal vilification as he got.

Joseph Cody

@Rick
Ah, the twisted logic of conservatives. Remember that Kennedy, Bork's replacement, has been more liberal than Bork would have ever been, so how his defeat could be regarded as a positive (for conservatives) beats me.

David Van Taylor

Interestingly enough, though the NYTimes obit got a lot of things right, they started with a faulty premise, or at least a misleading statement: "It is rare for the Senate in its constitutional 'advice and consent' role to turn down a president’s Supreme Court nominee ..."

In fact 20-25% of all Supreme Court nominees have been rejected by the Senate, a statistic that has remained roughly steady since the beginning of this republic. "Advice and consent" was a hard-won and meaningful compromise among the Founders; it was never intended to be a rubber-stamp. Something everyone should remember, especially those who, like Bork, want to adhere to "original intent."

Anyone interested in confirmation politics should check out my feature documentary ADVISE & DISSENT. Available on iTunes, Amazon, Netlifx, and YouTube. More info at AdviseandDissent.com

Rick

Conservatives should look at his Supreme Court nomination defeat as a positive, if Bork WERE on the court, President Obama would be naming his replacement...

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