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March 07, 2012

Comments

Captain Kirk

It's too late. If they were going to be prosecuted, it should have started back in 2010. This is about a massive transfer of property and equity, from mortgagees to banks. Huge campaign contributions to both parties have ensured that nobody will take the fall for this. As far as the foreclosure settlement is concerned, read Gretchen Morgenson's article in the Feb. 11th NY Times, and I quote: "There’s no doubt that the banks are happy with this deal. You would be, too, if your bill for lying to courts and end-running the law came to less than $2,000 per loan file."

Jaconda Wagner

I'm curious to know how difficult it would be to pursue criminal charges. A criminal charge and conviction of at least of the perpetrators would hopefully deter the practices.

Avon

Funny how Republicans in particular can become extremely agitated (and demand extreme consequences) after enforcement is lax against finance wrongdoers ... yet Republicans can also become extremely agitated (and blame Obama) after enforcement is strict against financial wrongdoers.

Witness, another article today about the new Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (if I've got that right) and how conservative critics say it's charging way too hard against money interests. True, that's the Senate Finance committee while this is Judiciary, but still ...

Joyce Krutick Craig

Senator Grassley has shown that Republicans and Democrats can agree. This is not a partisan issue, but one of plain common sense. Wall Street criminals should be prosecuted for the fraud they perpetrated upon millions of American citizens.

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