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« The Morning Wrap | Main | Chamber Leader Donohue Says Businesses 'Forging Ahead' Despite Tough Times »

January 12, 2012

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Comments

HSG

The Republican outrage is absurd. The Senate is required to advise and consent, not stonewall and deceive with puerile parliamentary games. They play a ludicrous procedural game to perpetuate the fiction they're in session, then get all outraged when Obama acts like adult. The GOP is deliberately attempting to derail the country simply to spite Obama. I'm glad he called their childish bluff.

DarrenMcKinney

The Emperor has no clothes, and this fig leaf of a memo from the OLC offers little cover.

"[A]s a practical matter"? What has practiciality got to do with it? Myriad state and federal laws are arguably impractical, but surely DOJ and the Obama White House don't mean to suggest that Americans thus have no obligation to follow such laws, do they?

If officials and/or ordinary citizens find certain laws impractical, they're free to work within our representative democracy of checks and balances to repeal or amend such laws. But last I checked, they're decidely not free simply to ignore the laws they find impractical.

Darren McKinney
Washington, DC

Nathaniel Fitzsimmons

A clearly partisan opinion. The House is required to give the Senate permission to recess, which it has not done. How the senate then decides to process its business is not within the purview of the excutive branch.

Frank Smith

Just curious, but by what alleged authority does a single member have, in order to legitimately gavel the Senate into session?

Does it have to be the Senate President, or can simply any member do so? Could Bernie Sanders, for instance call the Senate into session at 3:00 a.m. and pass legislation were there no one there to note the absence of a quorum?

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