Contributors

  • Andrew Ramonas
    Lobbying Reporter
  • Beth Frerking
    Editor in Chief
  • David Brown
    Vice President/Editor, ALM
  • Diego Radzinschi
    Photo Editor
  • Jenna Greene
    Senior Reporter
  • Marcia Coyle
    Chief Washington Correspondent
  • Mike Scarcella
    Washington Bureau Chief
  • Todd Ruger
    Capitol Hill Reporter
  • Tony Mauro
    Supreme Court Correspondent
  • Zoe Tillman
    D.C. Courts Reporter

« The Morning Wrap | Main | House Votes to Stop 'Equal Access to Justice' Fees »

February 18, 2011

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451d94869e2014e5f4dc35f970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Suit Charges D.C. Police Executed Search Warrant at Wrong Apartment:

Comments

Free Man

no, they lived in the next building in #305 according to the complaint - note the invaded address is 1002 12th Street SE (note the number two)and the search warrant was for 1000 12th Street SE - they weren't even at the right building when they executed a no-knock warrant. So, A) wrong apartment B) it is not legal in DC to knock down doors in the circumstances described, and C) officers ignored the health concerns of the old lady.

If it'd been my house I would have opened fire on the first head through the door after they kicked it down with no prior notice and likely get shot myself by the second guy through because of this blatant negligence.

theprez98

The man and his wife live in Apartment #305. Except there is no number on their door. The warrant was for #305. The police saw #304 on the door across the hallway and assumed that the door with no number was #305 (as it turns out, it was). So the man and his wife are complaining that that "the police officers negligently, intentionally, willfully, wantonly, and maliciously, forcibly entered the plaintiffs’ apartment without sufficient evidence that it was apartment #305." Except that it actually was #305.

They don't seem to be complaining that the information to get the warrant was invalid (wherever it came from), but that their rights were violated when the police didn't check to be sure that what they thought was #305 was actually #305. Even thought it was.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Blog powered by Typepad

Advertisements