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« Women Still Under-Represented on the Bench | Main | Former U.S. Attorney Roscoe Howard Jumps to Andrews Kurth »

January 28, 2010

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Comments

Porcupine

“This good faith mistake bears no rational relationship to the draconian relief appellees propose.” Hmmm. Maybe Pearson should have reflected on that concept before filing the pants litigation that started it all.

Kev

God, I love this guy. Why does he not have a reality show?

thedoctor2001

Pearson displays every attribute of the classic "vexatious litigant." His nonsense should be dismissed immediately and the Clerk ordered to no longer accept his filings. He'll then turn to the internet.

Darren McKinney

I don't know Steve Candelario, but his comment suggests he may be as removed from reality as Roy Pearson Jr.

The applicable D.C. law that applies to the qualifications for the city's administrative law judges (ALJs) demands, inter alia, a "judicial temperament."

As my organization pointed out in an April 2007 letter to numerous D.C. officials, Pearson's vindictive and possibly racist multi-year vendetta of a lawsuit against hardworking small business owners -- seeking first $67 million, then $54 million for an allegedly lost pair of pants -- made it abundantly clear that he could not possibly possess the judicial temperament legally required to continue in his $105,000/year ALJ job beyond the initial two-year probationary period.

Thankfully, Pearson's quixotic "pantsuit" failed miserably, and he was not reappointed to the bench (imagine the taxpayers' outrage if he had been). Judge Huvelle's dismissal of his subsequent and similarly groundless wrongful termination lawsuit against D.C. officials and taxpayers was entirely and obviously justified, regardless of with whom she may be friendly or enjoy socializing from time to time.

Darren McKinney
American Tort Reform Association

Steve Candelario

Judge Huvelle’s participation and arm-in-arm photo with defendant Josey-Herring is outrageous. Seems like the case ended before it even got started...

In-House Lawyer

You are so right, Bob!

Bob

If he is representing himself, he has a fool for an attorney.

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