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September 01, 2009

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Comments

Droc

Without compensating creators?? The biggest drain on creator compensation is the RIAA, which holds a monopoly on music promotion and has controlled the music the public has accessible (retail distribution, traditional radio, etc.) for the past seven decades. Now they (Sony) tried (and failed)to shut down internet radio, because it's clearly threatening their empire. It's pathetic, and Congess has been compliant with industry in extending copyrights to unreasonable lengths that are, in my opinion (although unfortunately not the Supreme Court's) unconstitutional. The copyright royalty board should be declared unconstitutional, and replaced with officials that will actually be held accountable.

Smilin' Dave

Remember the FEC (Fed'l Elections Commission)? They had to do everything over after proper appointment. It could happen here too.

Tony Gottlieb

Isn't that odd?

I would have thought their violative use of music work, without compensating creators for this long, would be unconstitutional.
Oh , oh that's right, the payment part, that's statutory.

Come on folks let's wrap this up and get on with it. If you don't like the deal, create your own music. This is wearysome.

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