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« Ted Kennedy's Note to Rehnquist | Main | Supreme Court Statements on Death of Sen. Kennedy »

August 26, 2009

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Comments

John Steer

Another bipartisan achievement was the Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 that authorized the US Sentencing Commission and sentencing guidelines. Kennedy authored that legislation with Strom Thurmond, Orin Hatch and others. Of course, the Supreme Court screwed it up some 20 years later.

okiepokie181

Kennedy was a killer who got away with it, and one of the most liberal people in the country. I should expect all you liberals to mourn him. I don't. He should have gone to prison a long time ago. I am sure he will have to answer to Mary Jo Kopechne now. His legacy is that he was a coward who let a woman die, and attempted to make up for it.

BeanerECMO

Just as it is now, he was first and foremost a social welfare collectivist. He did not believe in a hand up; only a handout, and made sure that those who were on the receiving end of his largess (of taxpayer money) knew and remembered who was filling the trough.

Jaysit

Ted never claimed to lead Camelot. He led America. In real time. If you were an immigrant, a woman, disabled, sick, old, dying, diseased, a racial or ethnic minority, or a child of any race, type or creed living in America over the past 40 years, you have Ted to thank. So, thanks Ted.

BeanerECMO

My condolences to his family. He was a leader; he was not a great leader. Remember, Camelot was a fictitious place.

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