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April 01, 2009

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Comments

Marcus

Maybe some paid to get Stevens off at all cost(one poster surmised the opposite),yet, how many guys have 13 attorneys repping for him from the most expensive, high powered D C law firm ?
Also, how often to you see an FBI guy rat out some other FBI agent, claiming, or setting up some suggestion she was having sex, because she was in a motel room, maybe refreshing recollections of the main witness for the Government ? Wacko, or what ?
Most curiously, the two FBI agents at the center of this stuning turn of events, to toss the Stevens conviction, never testifed at the Stevens trial. Certainly, questions on the FBI agents handling of matters will linger on(Bush Admin oversaw the matters, & why did no FBI agent testify on the cost aspects of the A -Frame house as build, as additons for Stevens, that is puzzling indeed, given the house additions were the basis for some supposed big gift to Stevens(compared to any checks he wrote, in the full picture of events.)
Stevens picked out a man to run the add on show for his house, who just happened to be a major criminal in Alaksa, Allen, and AG Eric Holder giving Stevens a pass,(upsetting a jury verdict) does not shove under the rug major lingering questions, which are not going to just go away. That was assured in view of all the fuss matters have caused, and Congress(some in Senate) cheering for the TED pass, missed the larger point in matters.
Ted at age 85 may enjoy his old age, not from rotting in a prison, but the questions on the U S justice system and how it handles the powerful has only risen to more pressing and urgent issues, not to be ignored.

Mitch

Why would Ted Stevens pick the main criminal in Alaska to run the building of his house additions, when there are many honest contractors in Alaksa, have any pondered that question, including Mr O'Brien of the DOJ Narcotics section--Mr sub for the DOJ political agenda ?
He filed a motion to dismiss the jury conviction of Ted Stevens, but his irrational motion raised more questions than it answered.
Was Allen lying to protect Stevens in April of 2008, so how can that be an innocent thing,(proof of Stevens innocence) since they were good buddies, and other evidence showed big cost numbers well above $ 80,000.
And, the Bush DOJ was running the show in 2008, so why were 4 DOJ attorneys so inept that they never asked about the whole way costs run through an account(Girdwood Stevens' property), and why the job ledger showed $ 100,000 higher than noted in the interview, none of which is an exoneration statement as to Stevens, but a use of a convicted criminal to game the system and play the DOJ as suckers, real dopes, gullible, like babes to be conned.
If Mr O'Brien, playing some DOJ politics for Eric Holder, & wants to claim some exoneration evidence for Stevens, it is a sad day, when the whole picture is ignored, like this is some game for the white collar D C bar,(which Holder is so entrenched in) to jive the U S justice system around(Marc Rich style) for the powerful, and the abusers to game the system. That makes a mockery of justice, and it is not going to fly, as more comes out.


Chris

I can't get over Senator Leahy's comment that this should make people confident in the system. To me this is just another terrifying example of the power held by prosecutors and law enforcement. If it turns out that the allegations of misconduct are true, then the DOJ attorneys and FBI agents should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law which they so callously disregarded.

troup

Why would a prosecutor commit the crimes of withholding evidence and sending a witness away? Was it political or someone trying to get ahead. Could these individuals be paid by someone to get Senator Stevens at all cost?

Don Karabelnikoff

In a local Public Radio interview last winter, I heard a former U.S. Attorney for Alaska say several times he was "shocked" by the allegations contained the the FBI whistle-blower's complaint. He then said it seemed possible FBI agents and/or federal attorneys could be spending time in jail.

On one hand, I hope justice will be rendered for those who ruined Ted Stevens a man who has clearly done his best to do what he thought was right.

On the other hand, I wonder if it's possible to provide due restitution for the man who was wrongly convicted, who lost his re-election bid to the Senate as a result, and whose reputation has been irreparably damaged.

If this is more of a political issue than a legal issue, what can and should the politicians do now?

//Don K. of Anchorage

Witheld

Ok, so let's just sweep this mess under the rug so that nobody sees just how misguided and unethical the line and senior prosecutors in this case behaved. NOT! The criminal case will be dismissed but I hope the contempt trial proceed and an disbarment investigation commence.

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